UP&DOWN



PEOPLE UP

David Čížek
Photo: T. Kubeš
David Čížek
The head of DCCI announced that his company is the first in this country to release a catalogue of mobile phone games, and began to distribute it in stores. Games that are chosen by the client are sent directly to the user’s phone without the necessity of a computer.
Miro Smolák
Photo: T. Kubeš
Miro Smolák
Activities of the owner of Gallery Miro are expanding to include plans for building a Salvador Dalí museum in Prague. The design of Dalí Palace was assigned to the well-known architect Daniel Liebeskind, whose “Tower of Freedom” will replace the former Twin Towers in New York.
Alexis Juan
Photo: P. Poliak
Alexis Juan
The CEO of Komerční banka accepted the European Bank’s Reconstruction and Development award for the “Most Active Bank in Central and Eastern Europe in 2003″. 10% of all Czech banking transactions were carried out by KB last year.

PEOPLE DOWN

Richard Falbr
Photo: ČTK
Richard Falbr
The senator and ČSSD candidate for the European Parliament fell asleep at the European congress of the socialistic and social-democratic parties, during a speech of Poul Rasmussen, the newly elected chairman of the European Socialistic Party. stormy applause.
Jaroslav Palas
Photo: ČTK
Jaroslav Palas
The Minister of Agriculture’s was caught speeding on the highway at 230 km/h. In spite of his explanation that he wanted to be on time for a seminar about wine-growing in Hustopeče, he was scolded for the reckless driving by premier Špidla.
František Kozel
Photo: ČTK
František Kozel
The deputy of vice-premier Petr Mareš is under police investigation, because he illegally kept materials in his office related to the case of Jiří Berka, a judge charged with false bankruptcies. The police believe Kozel wanted to maniputate the investigation.

 

Kamil Ziegler
Photo: Tomáš Kubeš

Lucie Mádlová: Forward with youth!
LUCIE MÁDLOVÁ (25) is a dynamic entrepreneur the likes of whom there are few in the Czech Republic. A year ago she entered the market with an original idea – Fly By Car, which she co-owns and runs, offers alternative transport for those who don’t want to fly but need to get somewhere up to 500 kilometers away quickly. “Our clients travel in a luxury BMW or Mercedes directly from one place to another. They don’t need to change vehicles several times on the way, wait for clearance, or walk through control points,” Mádlová says, adding that reliable drivers see to clients’ complete comfort. In terms of time and money, a trip is comparable to one by plane, but has the advantage of flexibility when it comes to ordering or cancelling.
Fly By Car also offers trips within Prague. Of course this is nothing new, and the competition is heavy. However, Mádlová is set on fighting. “It’s hard to assert yourself on the market, but we’re betting on a personal approach, perfect services, and our good reputation. We have seen that once someone starts to travel with us he or she comes back,” she says with satisfaction. She learned assertiveness, as well as humility and patience, during a stay in the US, where she cared for a mentally handicapped girl. She’ll need those traits to reach the goal she has her mind set on. She wants her firm, which currently employs seven persons, to keep growing, and one day gain broad recognition. “Business is a challenge. I like it that I can run the company directly and see the results immediately,” says this so-far single but engaged, golfer, who has no intention of sacrificing everything for her work. “I don’t want to do business to the detriment of my private life. To me, a balance between family and work is fundamental,” she declares.

 

 

Vladimír Pikora
Photo: Tomáš Kubeš

Pino Confessa: Living the good life
FOR THE TENTH YEAR the vital Italian Pino Confessa (56) is helping cultivate Praguers’ tastes in fashion. His shops, Reporter and Nový svět (New World), are sought out by actors, singers, politicians, and entrepreneurs. The reason movers and shakers in the Czech Republic shop at Confessa’s shops is obvious. When in 1994 he opened his men’s fashion store (Reporter) and his women’s fashion shop (Nový svět), he was one of the few importers of well-made garments and superior tailoring from Italy. “At that time I saw only two colors on the streets – black and white. It was boring,” he says. As soon as he introduced Italian brands such as Brioni (which, following his successful entry, opened its own shop), Canali, and Les Copains in Prague, his clothes quickly became popular. Although his goods are high-end, 85% of his Nový svět customers are Czechs, and the situation with his men’s fashions is similar. “Czechs are becoming more affluent, and their tastes are becoming more refined. They aren’t satisfied with just traditional things, they’re looking for something special,” Confessa claims.
He was inspired to go into the fashion business by his wife Milena, a former model, who convinced him to move from Italy back to her native land. His further successes in business bear out that it was a good move. He owns the furniture store Casa Italiana, he’s an importer and distributor of Italian wines, and last year he opened the Divinis wine bar. Everything he touches does well, which could be why he’s so happy in the Czech Republic. He spends his weekends at his cottage, and he most likes spending his free time watching television or reading books, or talking about wine. Although he doesn’t speak Czech, he wants to continue living here. “The mood is better here, and life’s more peaceful than in Italy,” he explains.

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